April 8, 2014    Bo   One of them is a square I knit for her   The only things I've ever knit were squares for Bo  
I started a game while cleaning: encircling Bo with all of her toys that I find on the floor. So far we’re at 6.

I started a game while cleaning: encircling Bo with all of her toys that I find on the floor. So far we’re at 6.

March 31, 2014    Trans Day of Visibility  

It’s Trans Day of Visibility! Here’s 15 Ways To Let Trans People Know You See Them and Care

autostraddle:

It’s Trans Day of Visibility! Here’s 15 Ways To Let Trans People Know You See Them and Care

image

International Trans Day of Visibility is here! This event, which happens each year on March 31st, was started by Rachel Crandall, the leader of Transgender Michigan. It exists so that we can focus on the trans people around us and the good that they do. She wanted a day that celebratedand recognized trans people who are still with us to go alongside Trans Day of Remembrance, which remembers those…

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March 30, 2014    you only live at least once  

Guys guys guys

I am drunk and all I have to say is:

1.) I love roller derby.

2.) I love my team.

3.) The first time I typed team in the above item it came out as tram.

4.) It seems like an oversight that I didn’t know that Quintron and Miss Pussycat have a song called Jamskate until yesterday.

5.) yaaaaaaaay.

March 27, 2014    Kitties  

lifeaquatic:

kedreeva:

8bitrevolver:

This was meant to be a quick warm up, but it turned into a comic that I’ve wanted to draw for a while. This is something that is extremely important to me, and I appreciate it if you read it.

A while ago, I heard a story that broke my heart. A family went a cat shelter to adopt. The daughter fell in love with a 3-legged cat. The father straight up said “absolutely not”. Because he was missing a leg. That cat was that close to having a family that loved him, but the missing leg held him back. Why?!

Many people have the initial instinct of “nope” when they see an imperfect animal. I get it, but less-adoptable does NOT mean less loveable. 9 out of 10 people will choose a kitten over an adult cat. And those 10% that would get an adult cat often overlook “different” animals.

All I want people to do is be open to the idea of having a “different” pet in their lives. Choose the pet that you fall in love with, but at least give all of them a fair shot at winning your heart.

Don’t dismiss them, they deserve a loving home just as much as any other cat. They still purr, they still love a warm lap, they still play, they still love you. Trust me, next time you are in the market for a new kitty, just go over to that one cat that’s missing an eye and see what he’s all about!

Let me tell to you a thing.

This is Lenore. I first saw her in a little cage at the Petco I frequent (I used to take my parents’ dog in for puppy play time), and she looked like the grouchiest, old, crotchety cat in the world, and I fell instantly in love. She was cranky, she was anti-social, hanging out at the back of her cage. Her fur was matted because she wouldn’t let the groomers near her.

She was perfect.

But I didn’t have a place for her. I wasn’t living in my own space yet, and where I was, I wasn’t allowed cats. So I pressed my face to the bars of her cage and I promised that if no one had adopted her by the time I’d bought a house, I would come back for her.

I visited her every week for over six months while I looked for a house. At one point, they had to just shave her entire rear-end because the mats or fur were so bad. They told me she clawed the heck outta the groomer that did it, screamed the entire time, and spent the next two days growling at anyone that came near the cage.

A couple of weeks later, I closed on my house. I went back and I got an employee, and I said: “That one. I need that cat.”

They got the paperwork and the lady who ran the rescue that was bringing the cats in told me that Lenore (at the time, Lila) was 8 years old, had been owned by an elderly lady who had died, and brought in to a different rescue, who’d had her for six months on top of the time I’d been seeing her at Petco.

This kitty had been living in a 3x3’ cube for over a YEAR because she was older and “less adoptable.”

I signed the paperwork, put her in a cat carrier, and drove her to my new home. I had pretty much nothing; a bed, an old couch, a couple of bookcases, and a tank of mice I called “Cat TV”. I let her out of the carrier and onto my bed, and I told her “I told you I would come back for you when I had a place. It’s not much, but it’s yours too now.”

Lenore spent the next three days straight purring non-stop. She followed me around the house purring. Sat next to me purring. Slept next to me purring. Leaning into every touch, purring, purring, always purring. She still purrs if you so much as think about petting her. She’s amazing, and I love her.

So, you know, if you’re thinking about adopting, and you see a beast that others consider “less adoptable,” think about Lenore.

I adopted Ace as an adult. Give the adult and less adoptable cats some love too!

Way to almost make me cry in a Tim Hortons, Internet.
But seriously. This comic speaks the truth.

(via lizlemming)

March 25, 2014

megaphonemagazine:

In over our heads: The Downtown Eastside’s mental health crisis signals a call for change across the city

When Aleta (she asked that we withold her last name to protect her privacy) moved into low-income housing in the Downtown Eastside in 2010, she didn’t expect it to be easy; she knew the transition into a new home and neighbourhood would come with its usual stresses. But she didn’t anticipate how quickly her life would spiral out of control. Within months of moving in, her post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was flaring up.

“I was kicking the wall and really angry,” she recalls. “I was angry about being in that building and being low income.”

Agitated by her PTSD and unused to the culture of surveillance in her single- room occupancy (SRO) hotel, Aleta felt watched by staff and not listened to when she complained about the harsh chemicals used to clean the building. The SRO’s policies started to feel like an intrusion: it prohibited residents from having overnight guests, staff installed security cameras in the building, and required everyone to check in when they entered.

Then, a flare-up between Aleta and building staff escalated to the point where Vancouver police officers detained her under B.C.’s Mental Health Act, which allows authorities to involuntarily admit people with serious mental health issues for treatment in hospital. Healthcare workers diagnosed Aleta with psychosis. According to her, she was involuntarily confined to a locked mental health ward for more than a month of observation.

Last September, Mayor Gregor Robertson and Vancouver Police Chief Jim Chu declared a mental health crisis in Vancouver and called for more assertive community treatment initiatives. Their high- profile pronouncement drew attention to mental health concerns among vulnerable populations like the low- income and homeless residents of the Downtown Eastside. Some politicians have even sought to reopen Coquitlam’s Riverview Hospital, a mental health facility controversial for its traditional approaches to mental health care, to create more long-term care options for those diagnosed with serious mental illnesses.

Most would agree there is a need for more assertive kinds of care. But many working on the front lines of mental health care say the best solutions incorporate holistic, non-medical community supports like mental health outreach, supportive housing and preventative care—not places like Riverview.

Frontline workers calling for more supportive housing, outreach, and preventative care for people with mental health issues work with people like Aleta every day. Mainstream media has historically over-focused on mental health crises featuring extraordinary acts of violence in public spaces, like Tim McLean’s grizzly 2008 beheading on a Greyhound bus in Manitoba.

But the majority of people diagnosed with mental illness—those whom frontline workers deal with most of the time—are more like Aleta: under the radar, largely suffering in silence, chronically under-housed and largely under-served when it comes to mental health outreach and advocacy. Aleta’s gentle demeanor, grey hair, short stature and soft, kitten-themed sweaters don’t fit the mass-culture picture of a person with mental health concerns.


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4:16pm    A-Camp  
EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE I still can’t believe this is actually a thing I’m doing! I’m so excited!

EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE I still can’t believe this is actually a thing I’m doing! I’m so excited!

(Source: autostraddlecamp)

March 24, 2014    Articles about Buffy and queer culture are my favourite  

Our Willow, Ourselves

askaqueerchick:

autostraddle:

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I’m not really into the standard “there are two types of people in the world” dichotomies. Human beings are varied and thrilling and obviously there are millionsof types of people in the world; whether you prefer, say, dogs or cats, or coffee or tea, does not define you as a person. That said, there are certain issues that do reveal aspects of your character based on where you stand on them. One…

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Hey, I’m on Autostraddle!  Having feelings, as I am wont to do, about Willow Rosenberg.

Love this article so hard!  This is how I like to think about Willow as well, even if the writers did kind of a bad job and didn’t intend it.  

March 22, 2014    derby   hockey - no thanks  

Got to the bout venue too early, so I’m hiding in a spare change room until hockey is over.

March 5, 2014    so sleep   sooooo  
Why am I not in bed yet: a photo.

Why am I not in bed yet: a photo.

February 20, 2014    Bo   I love my little cat  
Bo is all tuckered out after another visit to the vet (just a check up this time). She’s recovered pretty well, considering she’s had 2 strokes (we think) in the past 6 months. Today she was diagnosed with hypertension, so tomorrow it’s off to the compounding pharmacy to get her medication (which, thankfully, they can make in liquid form; she HATES being pilled).

Bo is all tuckered out after another visit to the vet (just a check up this time). She’s recovered pretty well, considering she’s had 2 strokes (we think) in the past 6 months. Today she was diagnosed with hypertension, so tomorrow it’s off to the compounding pharmacy to get her medication (which, thankfully, they can make in liquid form; she HATES being pilled).